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Almost a week after the 59th Annual Grammy Awards‘ aired and drama surrouding this year’s “Album of the Year” is still swirling. Adele, winner of said award, voiced her concern with the honor during her very own acceptance speech. The Guardian calls the unexpected address to Beyonce— a strong continder for the award— “a frank admission of privilage.”

Last night, new images of the ‘Lemonade’ took Instagram by storm. It appears Bey and Mama Tina had some time to throw a little subtle shade at the Recording Academy and anyone defending the snub with a clear illustration of their frustration.

Earlier this week, little sister and now Grammy-Award winning artist Solange also voiced her concern and suggested the results were rigged. Many other celebrities agreed, and again, even Adele herself said: “I can’t possibly accept this award … I’m very humbled and I’m very grateful … but my artist of my life is Beyoncé. And this album to me, the Lemonade album, is just so monumental.”

Today, TMZ released an open letter to the Recording Academy by voting member and lead singer of The Village People, Victor Willis.

The document chellenges Neil Portnow, current president of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, to be more “transparent” in his explination of the Grammy’s voting process. According to Willis, there’s a not-so-secret “select committee” that has the power to override the decision of the general voting members if they do not “like” who was selected. He goes on to explain when and why this comittee was created in the first place, and raciail influence appears to be a key factor.

Willis closes his letter by requesting that the “select comittee” members and that the racial demographic be made known publicly.

What are your thoughts on this developing story? Do you think race is a factor in who wins which Grammy awards? Sound off below!

Wow! Recording Academy Accused of “Select Committee” Rigging Grammy Awards was originally published on foxy955stl.com

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