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Democrats are panicking because Black voters in Florida may not go to the polls in significant numbers to seal an important win for Hillary Clinton in the critical swing state, Politico reports.

Many analysts say a Clinton win in Florida would block GOP candidate Donald Trump‘s few paths to victory. However, she’s polling less than 85 percent among Florida’s 1.7 million Black voters (President Barack Obama won about 95 percent of the state’s Black voters in 2008 and 2012), and there’s growing concern that many of them will stay home on Election Day.

Consequently, the Clinton campaign plans to dispatch three of its heavy hitters to rally African-American support in Florida to spur turnout in swing states like Florida, North Carolina, and New Hampshire, where Republicans and Democrats enjoy the same level of support among voters.

In 2000, Florida was pivotal in the race between former Vice President Al Gore and George W. Bush. With that in mind, Politico reports that former President Bill Clinton is scheduled to tour North Florida on Friday, and President Obama is expected to campaign in the state at least two times in upcoming weeks. Meanwhile, First Lady Michelle Obama appears in a political radio ad in Florida, and she’s likely also to visit the state before the election.

“Hillary Clinton’s campaign is in panic mode. Full panic mode,” Leslie Wimes, a South Florida-based president of the Democratic African-American Women Caucus, told the news outlet.

Wimes added that the campaign overestimated the effectiveness of the Obamas urging Blacks to turn out for Clinton. Florida’s Black vote, she said, is largely anti-Trump, but people are better motivated by voting for someone.

Before Monday’s debate, Clinton held a narrow lead in Florida, Iowa and North Carolina, “all within the polls’ margins of error, with Clinton only well ahead of Trump in Virginia in this set of the surveys,” reports Politico reported Monday:

In North Carolina, Clinton’s advantage over Trump among likely voters is just a single point, according to a High Point University poll. The former secretary of state leads Trump 43 percent to 42 percent, with Johnson polling at 10 percent. Stein is not on the ballot in North Carolina.

The two-way presidential race is closest in Iowa, where a Loras College poll puts Clinton’s lead over Trump at just three-tenths of a point, 42.3 percent to 42 percent. The Manhattan billionaire edges slightly ahead in a four-way race, leading 38.3 percent to 37.7 percent over the Democratic nominee. Johnson earned the support of 9 percent of respondents while Stein polled at 1.2 percent.

Do you think Clinton can win in swing states? Let us know your thoughts in comments.

SOURCE: PoliticoPolitico | PHOTO CREDIT: Getty 


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